6 Superior iOS 8 Keyboards To What You Get From Apple

iOS 8 has a host of brand new features that are going to really make the iPhone a much more superior device. However, one of the most important features that comes with the new operating system is finally – finally! – the ability to use custom keyboards. Your liberation from Apple’s terrible keyboard is here everyone; rejoice! Apple’s tepid keyboard is made elementary by some of the more easy to use, and better functioning keyboards listed below. But, first, let’s go over how to add a new keyboard to your device.

In order to add a new keyboard, you’re going to have to download and install the individual keyboard application. Once you’ve done that, navigate to your keyboard preferences inside of your iPhone’s Settings application and add the keyboard to your list of available input methods. It’ll be added right next to the list that shows your keyboard language as English (US) and Emoji. Then, when you’re typing pretty much anything on your iPhone – email, text message, tweet, status update, etc. – you’ll be able to access the new alternative input method by tapping on the little globe icon next to the spacebar on the left.

SwiftKey and Swype


SwiftKey and Swype are adding iOS compatible platforms for the highly popular Android keyboards (free, $1). The two keyboard styles are similar at their core, but frankly their difference is really a matter of taste. They’re both based on a swiping input method; all you have to do is put your finger down on the keyboard and drag from letter to letter until the keyboard’s input algorithm figures out what word you’re trying to spell. As one who uses this keyboard regularly on my Droid, I have to say that I really enjoy it, and it pretty accurately (about 90%) inputs the word that I’m trying to type. Even if you slide sloppily, it generally works with around the same success rate.

The predictive tech is supplemented by a learning algorithm that analyzes your style from your inputs on the keyboard over time, as well as from what you type in to Gmail, Twitter, Facebook, etc. The keyboard also functionally allows you to type your words out as well, if that’s more your thing, and it also records your habits in the same manner.

Fleksy


Fleksy is a keyboard that I don’t have much experience with. However, if you are a terrible speller, Fleksy is apparently a God-send. For any time that you’re in a hurry or typing on the move, the autocorrect feature is incredibly accurate, and can translate even the most haphazardly typed words. The application also responds to gestures, and you can make the application run faster that way. If you don’t like the first autocorrect suggestions Fleksy provides, you can swipe through other suggestions until you find the right one. If you don’t like any of the suggestions provided to you, you can actually swipe from left to right across the screen, which acts essentially as a giant delete button. The application costs $1.

TextExpander


TextExpander will be introducing a keyboard application that makes typing out all of those long and tedious things you type all the time that much easier. TextExpander already exists as a popular desktop utility that is able to turn shortcut phrases into more long-form writing.

TextExpander already exists as an iPhone application, but because of Apple’s sandbox, you couldn’t use it to expand snippets in other apps unless you implemented the SDK. Thanks to iOS 8′s Extensions feature, your snippets can finally be used anywhere on your phone. The keyboard just went live with the latest TextExpander update ($5).

PopKey


Before PopKey, the only way to text a reaction GIF to a friend or a group chat was to hunt for one in your image library. That, or go into your browser and save a GIF image into your library, and then go into your library, and share it into your chat. That takes a lot of time! Luckily, you don’t have to do that anymore…assuming sending reaction GIFs to your friends is one of your more primary concerns. PopKey comes with a library of thousands of GIFs that express just about any type of reaction that you might need. Though PopKey isn’t live yet, it will be in the near future.

from Douglas MacFaddin’s Tech Market Page http://ift.tt/1thnBvq

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Published by: Doug MacFaddin

Douglas Willis MacFaddin was born June 16, 1961 in the Miamisburg Hospital to Patricia Ann MacFaddin and Richard Willis MacFaddin. My mother’s maiden name is Morrison and she is the youngest of seven children who were raised in Lycippus, PA. My father was the second of four children and was a twin. He was raised in the town of Viola, DE. At the time of my birth, my father worked at the Mound Laboratories in Miamisburg, Ohio in research. Mound was an Atomic Energy Commission facility for nuclear weapon research during the Cold War. My mother made a home for our family. My father passed away in 1991 and my mother is currently living in Avon, CT. Doug MacFaddin is the oldest of five children (Doug, R. Stuart, Anne Marie, Megan and Mary (Heather)). I lived in Ohio for two years, spent the next seven years in Murrysville, PA (outside of Pittsburgh), moved to Little Silver, NJ and relocated my senior year in high school to Avon, CT. My four siblings currently live with their families in Avon, CT and are members of St. Ann’s Church. I attended Mother of Sorrows School in Murrysville, PA. In NJ, I attended Little Silver Point Road School, Markham Place School and Christian Brothers Academy (CBA) in Lincroft, NJ for three years. My senior year, I attended Avon High School and I then spent the next four years at Union College, Schenectady, NY. I received a BS in Industrial Economics and graduated in June 1983. While at Salomon Brothers, I was asked to attend a two-week seminar for Public Finance at the University of Michigan in 1986. In Little Silver, I was involved in Troop 126 where I achieved the rank of Life Scout and was both a Patrol Leader and a Senior Patrol Leader. I also was an alter boy at St. James Catholic Church and spent summers a the Ship Ahoy Beach Club in Seabright, NJ and caddying at the Rumson Country Club. At Christian Brothers Academy, I wrestled for the varsity squad for three years. I took second in the districts my junior year and went on to the regionals. I also ran on their cross country team freshman year and was part of the CBA Colt team that hasn’t lost a duel meet since 1973. My senior year at Avon, I won the wrestling States (S). I went on to wrestle at Union College and qualified for the Div III nationals twice (1981, 1982) and was co-captain both years. My senior year at Avon, CT, I also won the States (S) in pole vaulting. It was the first time Avon High School had a state champ in two sports in the same year. During my four years, I earned nine varsity letters between wrestling, track and football. In 1979, I was accepted into The National Honor & Merit Scholars Society. Upon graduating from Union College, I accepted a position at Salomon Brothers Inc in August 1983. I was an analyst in their Public Finance department at One New York Plaza. I lived in Park Slope, Brooklyn and spent the next four years working at Salomon Brothers. As a result of Black Monday, October 19, 1987 the Public Finance Department of Salomon Brothers was jettisoned to conserve capital. By November 1, 1987, I was working at Dean Witter Reynolds in the new Public Finance Department made up of many of my former Salomon Brother’s colleagues. The new Department was located on the 57th floor of 2 World Trade Center.

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